It just blasted my mind open! You can be free!
I had the opportunity to interview Janet Mock for Rookie. The above is the pull quote, but she emanated gems: on girlhood, on teenhood, on writing, on reading, on Bey and Clair Huxtable and on Zora Neale Hurston. I say this a lot when I’m inspired by interviews, but I will reiterate it: we are so lucky to be living in this time, in this now, in this moment, when Janet Mock exists. No hyperbole.

I’ve been so-so on TeeFLii’s mixtapes, they sound good but he gets a little borderline daterapey for me and I ain’t tryna hear that, they don’t sound THAT good. But this shit is ill, not just cause the song is hilarious (and he’s totally the only person in music being like “i DON’T want to mess around with your girl”), but also because the women in it, while ass-objectified, are portrayed with a great deal of physical power over both their own bodies and the situation they’re in. They are powerhouses, all definitely stronger than TeeFLii and most of the men in here. Stick around for the end, too. Anyway, he’s no Ty $, but I’m with this video. Also, again, song is hilarious.

JANELLE MONÁE IS GIRLPOWER. LOVE HER SO MUCH. I don’t think I linked it here yet, but a few weeks ago I flew down to Atlanta for a Billboard story on The Electric LadyWondaland Studios, and her general movement. Billboard only posted the first 1500 words (there are about 1500 more), so unless you buy the magazine you don’t get to read the part where I wrote that Deep Cotton, her producers and the band-duo that created the song for that Sonos commercial, are about to release a video in which a band of 150 women capture them and recite the SCUM Manifesto. (So people YouTubing “Sonos commercial song” will land on a video and inadvertantly learn about Valerie Solanas.) HER WHOLE CAMP IS SO DEEP. 

katherinestasaph
markrichardson:

jawnita:

Sheezus Talks: a critical roundtable/psychoanalysis of Yeezus from seven woman culture critics including myself, Tracy Garraud, Puja Patel, Maura Johnston, Jessica Hopper, Anupa Mistry, and Claire Lobenfeld. Readable right here.

I enjoyed reading this. If I could make one tiny observation that has nothing to do with the content of this piece: there is something interesting and maybe slightly disconcerting to me to in the subhed where the participants are referred to as “badass female culture critics.” I feel like women in this situation are more likely to be referred to as “badass,” which could be read as just a little bit condescending. The whole idea of the piece has to do with gender so identifying them as female makes perfect sense. But it’s very hard to imagine me being on a panel/roundtable of any kind and being referred to as a “badass” anything. And you know, I’m white, I’m male, I’m older, maybe my badassness, if it exists, is implicit, a privilege. Seeing it here popped out at me in a weird way, a thing that made me go “hmmm.”

I hear that. For the record, editor Rob Harvilla gave it the hed and dek, and then asked me if I thought he should add “badass.” I was like “HELL YEAH,” because I for one love being called a badass (thank you Rob), because that is what we are. If it feels like it is marginalizing or otherizing, sure maybe, but what is more marginalizing or otherizing is that even tho the group of women on this roundtable is pretty established, every single one of us still experiences being passed over for assignments and jobs in favor of men, even when we have more experience and expertise on specific topics than they do. So I’d rather call attention to our badassitude and underscore that we are all extremely smart and experienced and important, than feel any kind of way about that word standing out. To a lesser extent, but still worth mentioning: “badass” is a nicer and less controversial way of calling attention to #BadBitchAlert, which we were all feeling super hard, and which I would have titled the piece if it were on my blog or in my fanzine, but which seemed slightly inappropriate for a FAMILY ORIENTED MAGAZINE, ha. 

markrichardson:

jawnita:

Sheezus Talks: a critical roundtable/psychoanalysis of Yeezus from seven woman culture critics including myself, Tracy Garraud, Puja Patel, Maura Johnston, Jessica Hopper, Anupa Mistry, and Claire Lobenfeld. Readable right here.

I enjoyed reading this. If I could make one tiny observation that has nothing to do with the content of this piece: there is something interesting and maybe slightly disconcerting to me to in the subhed where the participants are referred to as “badass female culture critics.” I feel like women in this situation are more likely to be referred to as “badass,” which could be read as just a little bit condescending. The whole idea of the piece has to do with gender so identifying them as female makes perfect sense. But it’s very hard to imagine me being on a panel/roundtable of any kind and being referred to as a “badass” anything. And you know, I’m white, I’m male, I’m older, maybe my badassness, if it exists, is implicit, a privilege. Seeing it here popped out at me in a weird way, a thing that made me go “hmmm.”

I hear that. For the record, editor Rob Harvilla gave it the hed and dek, and then asked me if I thought he should add “badass.” I was like “HELL YEAH,” because I for one love being called a badass (thank you Rob), because that is what we are. If it feels like it is marginalizing or otherizing, sure maybe, but what is more marginalizing or otherizing is that even tho the group of women on this roundtable is pretty established, every single one of us still experiences being passed over for assignments and jobs in favor of men, even when we have more experience and expertise on specific topics than they do. So I’d rather call attention to our badassitude and underscore that we are all extremely smart and experienced and important, than feel any kind of way about that word standing out. To a lesser extent, but still worth mentioning: “badass” is a nicer and less controversial way of calling attention to #BadBitchAlert, which we were all feeling super hard, and which I would have titled the piece if it were on my blog or in my fanzine, but which seemed slightly inappropriate for a FAMILY ORIENTED MAGAZINE, ha.